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  • Sea Breezes August 2020 Issue
    Purchase the latest Sea Breezes issue (July 2020) Please note that if you take out a subscription for 6 or 12 issues the delivery charges are included saving you £1.60 in the UK or £7 ROW per Issue. If you already have a physical subscription there is no need to buy this issue. If you have a digital subscription then...
  • British Merchant Seaman at War, 1939-1945 by Bernard Edwards The men of Britain’s Merchant Navy, although unarmed civilians going about their lawful business, were the first to be involved with the enemy in the Second World War. Less than nine hours after the declaration of war on 3 September 1939, the Donaldson liner Athenia was sunk without warning by a...
  • Extraordinary Stories of Courage and Compassion at Sea Compiled by the RNLI In this collection of heart-wrenching and life-affirming missions, we hear blow-by-blow descriptions of some of the most dramatic rescues from the last twenty years. We experience these through the eyes of the lifesavers as they must make life-or-death decisions, face fierce conditions and tackle difficult and dangerous situations....
  • A Friendly Voice on Many a Dark Night by Larry Bennett Portishead Radio was the world’s largest long-range maritime radio communications station. Originally located at a site in Devizes, Wiltshire in 1920, the transmitters were relocated to Portishead, near Bristol, shortly after the receiving station was moved to Highbridge, Somerset during the 1920s. The station, originally operated by the British...
  • An Officer’s Account by Mathieu J Oosterwijk Early 1970, Holland America Line (HAL) heralded the company’s re-structuring and re-orientation after onehundred years of shipping passengers and cargo from Rotterdam to New York and back. The board of directors showed the fullest confidence in the new opportunities that cruise shipping would offer. This resulted in the 1970 order for a new...
  • A Reconstruction of the Most Powerful Warship of Its Day by John McKay Sovereign of the Seas was the most spectacular, extravagant and controversial warship of the early seventeenth century. The ultimate royal prestige project, whose armament was increased by the King’s decree to the unheardof figure of one hundred guns, the ship finally cost the equivalent of ten more...
  • by Ian Tew Aged just seven, author, Ian Tew, had learnt to sail and by his eighth birthday, he became the owner of a yellow sailing dinghy named Titwillow. It marked the beginning of what was to be a life at sea. After attending the Pangbourne Nautical College, which was an ominous experience, Ian left his seafaring family to join...
  • Tales of Wells Harbour by Robert Smith MBE, Wells Harbour Master The stories Robert Smith tells in this landmark book capture the soul of Wellsnext- the-Sea on the North Norfolk coast. As long- serving Harbour Master and former lifeboatman, Robert reveals the characters and events that have shaped the history and spirit of this historic coastal town. The book also...
  • by John Bevan Lionel Kenneth Phillip Crabb, OBE, GM, known as ‘Buster Crabb’ was a British Royal Navy frogman and MI6 diver who vanished during a reconnaissance mission around a Soviet cruiser berthed at Portsmouth Dockyard in 1956. An official cover-up soon ensued and a plethora of conspiracy theories to what happened to Commander Crabb were born. This book is...
  • Shipbuilders and Engineers of Sunderland by Patricia Richardson This book recounts the full story of these famous shipbuilders and mariner engineers on the River Wear. William Doxford built his first wooden ship in 1837 and moved to Pallion 20 years later. He bought his four sons into partnership and diversified into marine engineering. With the innovative ‘Turret Ship’, the business...
  • Brunel’s Great Western Steamship by Helen Doe The Great Western is the least known of Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s three ships, being overshadowed by the later careers of the Great Britain and the Great Eastern. However, the Great Western was the first great success, confounding the critics to be the fastest ship to steam continuously across the Atlantic. By 1826, steam...
  • Nine Days that Saved an Army By John Grehan, Alexander Nicoll The ‘miracle’ of Dunkirk is one of the most inspiring stories of all time. The British Expeditionary Force had been all but surrounded and, with the French armies collapsing on all sides, it appeared that Britain was about to suffer the heaviest defeat in its history. When Winston Churchill’s...
  • The Forgotten Victims of the Fatal Voyage By Julie Cook When Titanic foundered in April 1912, the world’s focus was on the tragedy of the passengers who lost their lives. Ever since, in films, dramatisations, adaptations and books, the focus has mostly continued to be on the ones who died. The Titanic and the City of Widows it Left Behind...
  • The Harwich - Zeebrugge Train Ferry Story by Kevin Hoggett This informative, bilingual book is a long overdue history of the train ferry service between Harwich and Zeebrugge, its precursors and its legacy. The author, Kevin Hoggett was intimately involved with the service as British Rail’s Rolling Stock Inspector in Zeebrugge, and in researching this book, he has also drawn...
  • Celebrating the First Decade 2010 – 2019 by Richard Kirkman & Richard Bastow Cruise & Maritime Voyages (CMV) celebrates a decade of operations this year, growing from a fleet of two ships in 2010, to become acknowledged as the UK’s leading independent cruise line with a choice of six small to medium-sized vessels and further expansion planned. CMV pride themselves...
  • When war broke out in August 1914, France had only two dreadnoughts in service, with a second pair running trials. The main body of the elite Arm e Navale was made up of the eleven battleships of the Patrie and Danton classes, both of which were intermediate designs with two main gun calibres. Older ships included survivors of the notorious...
  • A History by Simon Wenham Hobbs of Henley is not only one of the best-known businesses in Henley-on- Thames it also boasts one of the most exclusive and recognisable fleets of boats playing the river today. Simon Wenham’s illustrated history, written to mark the firms 150th anniversary, shows how this now prominent business grew from a riverside pub in the...
  • Purchase our Sea Breezes binder to store your magazines.
  • The Life, Last Voyage and Wreck of Titanic’s Tragic Twin by Simon Mills Launched in 1914, two years after the ill-fated voyage of her sister ship, RMS Titanic, the Britannic was intended to be superior to her tragic twin in every way. But war intervened and in 1915, she was requisitioned as a hospital ship. Just one year later, while...
  • U-Boat Ace Hans Rose by Markus F Robinson & Gertrude J Robinson Hans Rose was one of Germany’s most successful WWI U-boat aces, and its most successful ace during the convoy period when attacks by U-boats were most difficult and dangerous. This meticulously researched, carefully documented and lively biography examines German WWI submarine operations through the eyes of Hans Rose,...
  • And the World of Lieutenant W P Lucy DSO RN by David Hobbs Among all the celebrations of the RAF’s centenary, it was largely forgotten that the establishment of an independent air force came at a cost - and it was the Royal Navy that paid the price. In 1918, it had been pre-eminent in the technology and tactics of...
  • British Destroyers and Frigates
    The Second World War and After by Norman Friedman Since the Second World War the old categories of destroyer and frigate have tended to merge, a process that this book traces back to the radically different Tribal class destroyers of 1936. It deals with the development of all the modern destroyer classes that fought the war, looks at the emergency...
  • In Two World Wars by Norman Friedman Although the Royal Navy did not invent the submarine, Norman Friedman’s new book demonstrates how innovative the service was, to an extent which few will recognise. Its submarines performed well in combat in both World Wars, and often in unheralded ways. Few will be aware that in 1914, Britain had the largest submarine...
  • Brunel’s Great Western Steamship by Helen Doe The Great Western is the least known of Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s three ships, being overshadowed by the later careers of the Great Britain and the Great Eastern. However, the Great Western was the first great success, confounding the critics to be the fastest ship to steam continuously across the Atlantic. By 1826, steam...